Central Land Council Annual Report 2016-2017


OUTPUT GROUP 4 • Advocacy services

 Advocacy services chart

Output 4.1 Public awareness & education

The Central Land Council informs its constituents and the wider public of issues of importance to Central Australian Aboriginal people and promotes their achievements and aspirations. Many sections of the CLC contribute to the production of a wide range of information and education materials and presentations. Its communications unit is often the first port of call for members of the media and the public wishing to know more about contemporary Aboriginal culture and society in Central Australia.

Vincent Lingiari Art Award

The CLC marked the twin milestones of 40 years since the passing of the Aboriginal Land Rights Act and 50 years since the Wave Hill Walk Off with the inaugural Vincent Lingiari Art Award. The eldest daughter of the CLC’s first chair, art curator Hetti Perkins, selected the winning work: Marlene Rubuntja’s soft sculpture My future is in my hands. Ms Rubuntja, an artist from the Larapinta town camp, learned of her win at the packed opening of the Our Land Our Lives Our Future exhibition at Tangentyere Artists in Alice Springs in September 2016.

The award, a partnership with peak Aboriginal art organisation Desart, attracted 45 entries in a range of media from artists in the CLC region and beyond. The exhibition featured a selection of works shortlisted by Brenda Croft from the National Gallery and Stephen Gilchrist from the Sydney Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition was a professional development opportunity for Aboriginal staff from Desart member art centres, exposing them to many aspects of curatorial practice.

The CLC acquired four paintings for its collection, including Our Future by the winner of the CLC Delegates’ Choice Award, David Frank. Members chose his painting at the joint land councils meeting in Kalkaringi in August. Funding from Newmont allowed Desart and the CLC to produce a commemorative exhibition catalogue. The Peter Kittle Motor Company donated the prize money for the award.

The cover of a joint CLC–NLC statement presented at the historic meeting of both councils at Kalkaringi in August 2016 features Vincent Namatjira’s painting, Vincent Lingiari and Gough Whitlam. Mr Lingiari’s great great great grandson Zaccheus Rogers-Maylay reads along with his grandmother and CLC delegate Desley Rogers and mother Juanita Rogers.

The cover of a joint CLC–NLC statement presented at the historic meeting of both councils at Kalkaringi in August 2016 features Vincent Namatjira’s painting, Vincent Lingiari and Gough Whitlam. Mr Lingiari’s great great great grandson Zaccheus Rogers-Maylay reads along with his grandmother and CLC delegate Desley Rogers and mother Juanita Rogers.

At the Kalkaringi council meeting, CLC members voted for the Delegates’ Choice Art Award.

At the Kalkaringi council meeting, CLC members voted for the Delegates’ Choice Art Award.

CLC publications

During a period dominated by Federal and Territory elections, the NT’s remote housing and youth justice crises, constitutional reform, and the Commonwealth’s controversial work for the dole scheme, the CLC continued to respond to a high volume of media inquiries. The communications unit supported advocacy activities such as the successful campaign by Watarrka traditional owners to keep poker machines out of their national park. It generated media coverage of the achievements of CLC constituents, members, and staff and ensured that custodians were able to air their views about a sacred site desecration at Karlu Karlu (Devils Marbles).

Brochures and posters produced included bilingual resources; for example, to support informed decision making about the CLC’s community leasing model in Mutitjulu, to inform constituents about the Kurra–Granites Ten-Year Plan and to guide fire management planning.

Marlene Rubuntja from the Larapinta town camp won the Vincent Lingiari Art Award for her soft sculpture My future is in my hands.

Marlene Rubuntja from the Larapinta town camp won the Vincent Lingiari Art Award for her soft sculpture My future is in my hands.

It updated the tourist brochure sold with the Mereenie Loop entry permit and advanced a draft of the next instalment of its chronology, The Land Is Always Alive. The new publication will cover milestones of the years 1994–2016.

The CLC published and distributed three editions each of Land Rights News, including a special land rights anniversary issue, and of Council News. The latter updates constituents about the outcomes of the CLC’s council meetings.

David Frank’s painting Our Future won the Delegates’ Choice Award.

David Frank’s painting Our Future won the Delegates’ Choice Award.

Galaxy Research completed a report about its market research into the format, distribution, legibility, comprehension, and content relevance of Land Rights News, Council News, Community Development News, the CLC website and Facebook page.

The research drew on focus group discussions in six locations with seven representative constituent groups and found that most print publications were performing well. Community Development News stood out as ‘ticking all the boxes’ while there is room for improvement in the distribution of Council News Galaxy and the communications team presented the report to the executive and members. Some recommendations have already been implemented.

Senior policy officer Josie Douglas (right) argues her point on the ABC’s Q&A program filmed at Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, in June 2017. (Photo: ABC)

Senior policy officer Josie Douglas (right) argues her point on the ABC’s Q&A program filmed at Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, in June 2017. (Photo: ABC)

Digital archive officer Will Foster (right) shows the Tjuwanpa rangers how to tag photos and search records.

Digital archive officer Will Foster (right) shows the Tjuwanpa rangers how to tag photos and search records.

Teacher Valerie Patterson told the ABC’s Q&A panel that Lajamanu needs more support for Warlpiri language and culture programs. (Photo: ABC)

Teacher Valerie Patterson told the ABC’s Q&A panel that Lajamanu needs more support for Warlpiri language and culture programs. (Photo: ABC)

Digital archive officer Will Foster assists CAAMA at the ranger camp.

Digital archive officer Will Foster assists CAAMA at the ranger camp.

CLC online

The report also raised questions about the effectiveness of the CLC’s online presence in remote communities. Constituents’ poor internet and mobile phone access are the major factors, as is the age of the website that the CLC launched six years ago.

The number of visits to the site has dropped slightly, with just over one quarter of all visitors accessing the site with mobile phones or tablets. The high bounce rate (single-page visits in which the visitor left the site without interacting with the page) for these devices confirms that the site is now overdue for a redesign making it mobile friendly, more intuitive and easier to navigate.

Podcasts based on 37 of the more than 200 original interviews recorded for the CLC’s oral history book Every Hill Got A Story were published on the CLC website.

Fiona Kitson reads Community Development News – the CLC publication that ticks all the boxes according to independent research.

Fiona Kitson reads Community Development News – the CLC publication that ticks all the boxes according to independent research.

Vincent Lingiari Art Award judge Hetti Perkins.

Vincent Lingiari Art Award judge Hetti Perkins.

Constituents will also soon be able to access the original interviews and numerous previously unpublished images through the CLC’s digital archive ((http://clc.keepingculture.com/archive/index.php). This is because, since March and for the first time since funding for the digital archive officer position ran out in October 2014, a dedicated staff member is again in charge of the archive and has begun to upload new records.

The CLC has maintained and often exceeded the level of Facebook activity achieved in the previous reporting period. Its rangers provided input into a strategy for strengthening the CLC’s social media presence in remote communities and have taken part in writing and media interview training.

Table 13. Communications activities, 2014–17

Activity

2014–15

2015–16

2016–17

Media releases

23

23

20

CLC website visits

121,312

135,840

132,838

CLC newsletters

24

24

42

Land Rights News Central Australia

2

3

3

Special purpose videos

0

2

34*

Information booklets and brochures, interactive features

5

15

21

Posters

5

16

14

* Most of these videos were produced for the Southern Tanami IPA digital storybook

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