Central Land Council Annual Report 2016-2017


corporate management

Management and accountability

Responsibilities

• best practice accounting, financial management, and performance reporting, unmodified annual audit reports and financial sustainability

• robust corporate financial planning

• relevant, accurate and timely performance-based management and environmental impact reporting

• effective risk management, including managing appropriate governance and risk management frameworks and understanding management risk appetite

• procurement of funds to sustain and advance corporate and operational plans and performance of statutory functions

• compliance with all statutory regulatory requirements

• staff recruitment, training and development opportunities for administering Aboriginal corporations.

Ministerial directions

There were no directions, general policies or general policy orders issued by the responsible minister for the financial year.

Financial management

Estimates and review

Estimates of administrative expenditure submitted annually to the minister. ‘Additional estimates’ requests for essential additional resources are submitted as required. Approved estimates fund operational expenses, salaries and wages, and capital expenditure. The minister originally approved $17.872 million of funding from the Aboriginals Benefit Account (ABA) and a variation of $154,000 approved for building repair works related to the June 2016 storm damage to the Alice Springs offices.

Reporting

A half-yearly performance and operations report submitted to the minister in February 2017 met funding agreement and legislative obligations.

The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) performs the annual audit of the financial statements to determine compliance and whether they present fairly financial position, performance and cash flows. ANAO’s audit opinion indicates that the statements are free from material misstatement.

Risk management and fraud control

An annual review of the risk management plan and framework, including a risk profile and a ‘risk appetite’ reassessment, by the accountable authority (the chair and director of the CLC) took place in December 2016. The CLC uses the annual Comcover risk management benchmarking survey for assessing improvements.

The Commonwealth’s fraud control framework informs the CLC’s framework. The accountable authority takes all reasonable measures to prevent, detect and deal with fraud, including data collection, reporting, and investigation. It certified that the required fraud data was collected and reported as required, based on the ongoing maintenance of the fraud incident register. New staff complete the Commonwealth’s online fraud awareness training.

Internal practices and procedures ensure that appropriate financial authorisations and financial delegations are in place for rigorous monitoring and detection of anomalies. Accountable authority instructions are the appropriate financial expenditure authorities framework and are reviewed every July, taking into account changes in the value of money and organisation structure.

A code of conduct prescribes workplace personal and professional behaviour.

Audit Committee (s.45, Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cwlth) (PGPA Act))

The committee now comprises four independent members: Adrian Watts (accountant, appointed 2013); and Danny Masters (lawyer) and Bruce Walker (chair/director) appointed in 2010. During the year, the accountable authority increased the membership of the committee as part of a member rotation strategy, appointing Beverley Russ (accounting manager). The committee met three times during the year. It oversees an agreed work plan and audit charter and reports annually to the accountable authority.

Indemnities and insurance premiums
for officers

No indemnity against liability has been given by agreement or other means to a current or former officer. The CLC holds general liability and professional indemnity insurance, including directors’ and officers’ liability provisions, with Comcover and the compulsory professional indemnity insurance required by the Law Society Northern Territory for its legal practitioners.

Duty to keep the Minister /Finance Minister informed (s.19, PGPA Act)

In accordance with s.19 of the PGPA Act the CLC informed the Minister for Indigenous Affairs on 3 November 2016 that the accountable authority had become aware of a significant issue affecting the CLC. Comcover declined to fully meet the repair cost of the storm damage to the CLC’s Stuart Highway building. The minister subsequently assisted with an estimates’ variation and advice that the building subsidence issue would be dealt with on receipt of the engineer’s recommendations as part of the 2017–18 estimates budget.

Freedom of information

Aboriginal land councils and land trusts are listed in Part I of Schedule 2 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FoI). Pursuant to s.7 the CLC is not subject to FoI requests.

Judicial decisions and reviews by
outside bodies

There were no judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals that have had, or may have, a significant effect on CLC operations.

Human resources

Workforce engagement, training and development, and system improvement initiatives continue to be a priority of the human resources team. Automating and streamlining processes improved staff access to its services. A dedicated human resources service provider improved communication and service delivery and the team focused on robust reporting of metrics and continuous improvement.

Ongoing system improvements included a review of the current human resources and payroll system, resulting in system modifications and the establishment of an electronic help desk enhancing compliance, productivity and efficiency.

Employee profile

Table 26. Full time and part time staff expressed as full time equivalent, 2016–17

Salary classification

Total FTE

Aboriginal

%

Non-Aboriginal

%

Female

%

Male

%

ASO1

7.6

7.6

3.5

0.0

0.0

3.8

1.7

3.8

1.8

ASO2

34.6

34.4

15.9

0.1

0.1

7.7

3.6

26.8

12.4

ASO3

14.8

13.1

6.0

1.7

0.8

9.1

4.2

5.7

2.6

ASO4

26.9

21.6

9.9

5.3

2.5

12.3

5.7

14.6

6.7

ASO5

17.6

9.6

4.4

8.1

3.7

9.8

4.5

7.8

3.6

ASO6

69.0

8.2

3.8

60.7

28.0

35.5

16.3

33.5

15.4

SOGC

27.0

5.0

2.3

22.0

10.1

12.4

5.7

14.6

6.7

SOGB

5.8

1.0

0.5

4.8

2.2

3.8

1.8

2.0

0.9

SOGA

11.1

0.0

0.0

11.1

5.1

6.5

3.0

4.6

2.1

SES1

2.0

0.0

0.0

2.0

0.9

0.0

0.0

2.0

0.9

SES2

0.9

0.9

0.4

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.9

0.4

Total

217.3

101.4

46.7

115.8

53.4

100.9

46.5

116.3

53.5

Note: Sums may vary due to rounding

Table 27. Part time and full time staff (headcount) at 30 June 2017

Salary classification

Total

Aboriginal

%

Non-Aboriginal

%

Female

%

Male

%

ASO1

9

9

3.9

0

0.0

5

2.2

4

1.7

ASO2

44

44

19.1

0

0.0

8

3.5

36

15.7

ASO3

16

14

6.1

2

0.9

10

4.3

6

2.6

ASO4

26

21

9.1

5

2.2

14

6.1

12

5.2

ASO5

19

9

3.9

10

4.3

11

4.8

8

3.5

ASO6

71

7

3.0

64

27.8

34

14.8

37

16.1

SOGC

25

5

2.2

20

8.7

11

4.8

14

6.1

SOGB

6

1

0.4

5

2.2

4

1.7

2

0.9

SOGA

11

0

0.0

11

4.7

6

2.6

5

2.1

SES1

2

0

0.0

2

0.9

0

0.0

2

0.9

SES2

1

1

0.4

0

0.0

0

0.0

1

0.4

Total

230

111

48.3

119

51.7

103

44.8

127

55.2

Table 28. Casual staff expressed as full time equivalent, 2016–17

Salary classification

Total

Aboriginal

Non-Aboriginal

Female

Male

ASO1

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.1

ASO2

2.8

2.8

0.0

0.7

2.1

ASO3

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.1

0.0

ASO4

1.3

1.2

0.0

0.2

1.1

ASO5

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.0

0.3

ASO6

1.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

0.7

Total

6.3

5.2

1.1

2.0

4.4

Table 29. Full time equivalent staff by ranger group, 2015–17

Ranger group

2015–16

2016–2017

Ongoing

Casual

Total

Ongoing

Casual

Total

Anangu

0.5

0.0

0.5

0.0

0.0

0.0

Anangu Luritjiku

4.6

0.4

5.0

3.7

0.1

3.8

Anmatyerr

7.7

0.0

7.7

5.7

0.0

5.7

Arltarpilta Inelye

4.3

0.1

4.4

4.3

0.0

4.3

Kaltukatjara

4.1

0.2

4.4

3.8

0.0

3.8

Ltyentye Apurte

7.1

0.0

7.1

6.0

0.0

6.0

Murnkurrumurnkurru

5.6

0.0

5.6

5.7

0.0

5.7

Muru-warinyi Ankkul

7.6

1.4

9.0

5.8

0.1

5.9

Northern Tanami

6.1

0.0

6.1

5.7

0.0

5.7

Tjuwanpa

8.0

0.4

8.4

7.1

0.0

7.1

Warlpiri

4.6

1.2

5.7

2.7

0.7

3.4

Program administration/support

8.2

0.0

8.2

6.3

0.0

6.3

Total

68.5

3.6

72.1

56.8

0.9

57.7

Note: Sums may vary due to rounding

Employee relations

The Fair Work Act 2009 and the CLC’s enterprise agreement 2012–15 establish employment terms and conditions and entitlements. Negotiations are ongoing to establish a new agreement. The Australian Public Service Commissioner approved a revised draft enterprise agreement and remuneration proposal, in accordance with the Commonwealth Government’s bargaining policy in June 2017.

Salary progression is subject to meeting the required performance standards. Performance bonuses were not paid.

Work health and safety

The CLC met its obligations under the Work Health and Safety (National Uniform Legislation) Act 2011. Its review of the work health and safety (WHS) management system, started in 2014, is almost complete.

The WHS committee met five times. Its focus remained on maintaining the WHS management system; conducting workplace inspections and emergency evacuation drills at all sites; and reviewing and updating WHS policies, procedures and standard operational procedures.

Reporting requirements under the WHS Act

The following statements are provided in accordance with the Act:

• There were no notifiable incidents reported to Comcare under s.38.

• No notices were issued under s.90 (provisional improvement notices), s.191 (improvement notices), s.195 (prohibition notices) or s.198 (non-disturbance notices).

WHS Committee Statement

The CLC is committed to providing a safe workplace. It has a primary duty of care to its employees, traditional owners and other persons.

It provides a safe environment for all employees, constituents, contractors and visitors at all work places by:

• implementing safe work systems meeting legislative requirements. The responsibilities and system framework are outlined in its WHS management arrangements

• consulting with and educating employees in safe work practices and their responsibility to work safely

• regularly monitoring work practices through internal and external audits and improving by measuring performance against safety objectives and targets

• identifying risks and implementing controls to reduce risk as far as practical

• encouraging safety leadership throughout the organisation and celebrating safety achievements.

Workforce development

The CLC continues to demonstrate its strong commitment to workforce development and training by appointing a dedicated human resources training and development officer. This has enabled employees to receive support to undertake vocational education and training, and tertiary and other learning opportunities.

Table 30. Staff vocational education and training, 2016–17

Type of vocational education
and training

Number of employees

Study agreements (a further two staff are negotiating study agreements)

7

Accredited training by the CLC, including in dispute resolution

78

Needs-based short courses, conferences, information seminars and workshops

217

National indigenous cadetship support program (one graduated with a Bachelor of Computer Science and secured full time employment in Queensland)

3

Total staff undertaking vocational education and training

305

Aboriginal manager development

A development pilot program, supported by specific funding approved by the minister, commenced with six Aboriginal senior staff who are employed as managers or co-ordinators and informally coach and mentor other Aboriginal employees. The program provides a structured path for Aboriginal employees to advance to more senior and leadership positions.

Information services

The implementation of the electronic document and records management system (EDRMS) known as eDIS (electronic Document and Information System) has made for a demanding time for the information services team. Taxonomy adjustments, functional development and subprojects, such as project and contract registers, are ongoing.

Weekly eDIS training sessions are becoming increasingly popular. The sessions provide a refresher following the general training delivered to all staff in October 2016, including more than 200 staff inductions.

During the year, the resource centre/library doubled as office space to enable continuous operation of other sections that had to move temporarily due to office repairs. Accommodating the significant changes to allow other staff to move temporarily into the library space over a six-month period has been challenging for the library team. It limited some projects, while others had to be stopped intermittently as resources were stored off-site. Regular events continued, however, such as promoting a new-item notification. Sharing the library space with other staff has also created the opportunity to rearrange its layout to make room for future developments.

CLC staff farewell mentor and project officer Becky Mack (centre), who moved to her first position outside the CLC after 15 years.

CLC staff farewell mentor and project officer Becky Mack (centre), who moved to her first position outside the CLC after 15 years.

In May 2017, the CLC commenced scanning and registering incoming mail in eDIS and distributing it electronically as an additional service to meet compliance.

Archival space has become scarcer, particularly with the inclusion of records previously stored and managed off-site. To counteract this, a major disposal is underway. Some collections have been returned to their owners or to more suitable archives.

Jody Lynch and Cherisse Buzzacott with the CLC’s senior policy officer Josie Douglas during an Oxfam leadership summit in Canberra.

Jody Lynch and Cherisse Buzzacott with the CLC’s senior policy officer Josie Douglas during an Oxfam leadership summit in Canberra.

Archives staff are heavily involved in a joint project with the Australian Research Council. Memory of the Centre aims to reintegrate Central Australian community cultural collections, by digitising CLC material and making it accessible to constituents via the CLC’s digital archive at http://clc.keepingculture.com/archive/index.php (see also page 78).

The information services electronic help-desk has handled more than 500 support requests since it started in October 2016.

An information management framework was approved and a major operational review is ongoing.

The information services team supported the review and redevelopment of some of the CLC’s business templates and logos and staff development in digital information and records management.

Continuous staff development focussed on the Digital Information and Records Management Capability Matrix for Australian Government Employees.

Doris Stuart is pleased to view photos of her taken near Alice Springs in the 1980s on the CLC’s digital archive. (Photo: Jenny Green)

Doris Stuart is pleased to view photos of her taken near Alice Springs in the 1980s on the CLC’s digital archive. (Photo: Jenny Green)

Leonard Kunoth, son Jimmy and daughter Sherana viewing photos and audio recordings of Leonard’s father at Utopia in the 1980s. (Photo: Jenny Green)

Leonard Kunoth, son Jimmy and daughter Sherana viewing photos and audio recordings of Leonard’s father at Utopia in the 1980s. (Photo: Jenny Green)

Computer services (information systems)

The CLC’s computer services team develops, supports and maintains modern computing infrastructure, and provides a high level of service including to regional offices, through the provision of the best available communication systems and remote support services.

Each of more than 200 employees, with the exception of rangers, has a fully networked, standardised computer workstation with access to email, word processing, internet and other services. The computer services team ensures the integrity and security of the electronic data through backup systems, secure network access, and virus protection. It also facilitates increased efficiency through the development and implementation of new systems that provide improved access to information and communications.

Three specialist staff maintain an extensive geographical information system and manipulate geographic data sets to produce customised maps for projects. Work is in progress to expand the services through web-based mapping systems.

The major goals included finalisation of the EDRMS deployment, exchange mail server upgrade, a major wide area network (WAN) data service migration and procurement of a new phone system. Ongoing building damage, employee relocations and some employee issues prevented some planned visits to regional offices.

Table 31. Computer services’ major achievements, 2016–17

Major achievements

Outcome

General operations

Maintained a large, complex information and communication technologies (ICT) network in regional and remote areas with no significant downtime or data loss; 2,118 support cases actioned, 65 new user accounts created, 220 access control cards issued.

Flood damage relocations

During the main office building repairs CS planned and executed more than 300 computer, phone, printer and account relocations, which provided employees with normal access to all ICT services while working at temporary desks. During this process, staff packed, relocated, and returned all their office and storeroom equipment and consumables.

Exchange mail server upgrade

Major upgrade completed with no unplanned downtime or data loss incurred, and no significant post-migration issues: a difficult project delivered successfully with minimal concern. Migrated meeting room bookings to electronic resource calendars to simplify booking process.

EDRMS implementation

Implemented desktop environment changes and deployed the eDIS standard opening environment to 250 desktop clients. Included organisation-wide upgrade to Microsoft Office 2016.

WAN service migration

Replaced inadequate ADSL internet connection with a symmetrical 50Mbps business-grade service. Commenced upgrade and migration of WAN data services across 14 offices, very near to completion.

AAMC office relocation and recovery site

Assisted in the renovation, planning and relocation of AAMC staff to the renovated Bath Street office. Installed the infrastructure required to allow the site to provide ICT business continuity in the event of a disaster at the main office.

PBX system upgrade planning and procurement

Thoroughly investigated and assessed current telephony technologies. Selected a new PBX system that will offer more features to more offices, while also improving quality and reliability.

SharePoint development

Planned and implemented numerous support SharePoint request lists, calendars and workflows that have improved co-ordination and service provision across multiple sections.

Finance system migration

Participated in the planning and implementation of the new finance system, including provision of additional servers, a new database, and deployment of client software.

Spatial services unit

Made good progress since a restructure, implementing a geodatabase and new processes that have significantly streamlined day-to-day duties, allowing the unit to spend more time supporting other sections, and planning a new online mapping platform. Continues to produce essential high-quality geographical information system (GIS) products.

Asset management

Fleet management

The CLC owns and manages a substantial vehicle fleet, including 4WDs, people movers, all-terrain vehicles, and medium and rigid trucks. The fleet management strategy ensures reliable, safe, and robust vehicles that are fit for purpose. It replaces the majority of the fleet every three to four years, depending on use, as by that time remote operational vehicles reach their optimal age and maintenance expenditure escalates.

It implemented a transport study, including a review of the fleet mix and type of vehicle, in consultation with the WHS committee, developed key performance indicators to monitor the implementation phase, reviewed the current booking system, and changed the fleet mix as per the study’s recommendations. The implementation is now into its third year and next will move into the monitoring phase. A business systems analyst reviewed the vehicle booking and fleet management processes, and developed a technical specification to further explore a new booking system.

Monitoring and reviewing the emergency response function continued to ensure functionality of the Navman GPS Tracking systems, for example, GPS critical duress, rollover and impact alerts. Of three alerts generated, none were genuine emergencies.

Property management

There are three CLC offices in Alice Springs and eight regional offices, as well as local and regional staff accommodation. The building asset management strategy combines engineering and financial and economic practices with an acceptable and cost effective service. A panel of contractors selected by tender regularly undertakes maintenance across the region. The contractors are based in Alice Springs and some regional areas, enabling a quicker response to critical infrastructure issues.

In June 2016 two severe weather fronts moved through Alice Springs, substantially damaging the main office at 27 Stuart Highway. Repairs costing in excess of $750,000 were completed during the year and included some minor maintenance upgrades, such as replacement of all floor coverings throughout the building, painting and some internal layout changes. Management successfully minimised disruption to service delivery. During the repairs it was noticed that the building was subsiding since 2009, particularly along the eastern side. A full structural review and internal survey was undertaken by Opus engineers to review the extent of the subsidence and provide recommendations to rectify the problem. These recommendations include major civil works to the onsite stormwater management, replacement of some internal glass office partitions and upgrades to the syphonic roof drainage. It is expected that this work will commence in the 2017–18 financial year as the minister has authorised funding.

The construction of a new regional office in Papunya commenced this year. The design includes a regional office, training room and visitor accommodation. Following a full open tender process Tangentyere Constructions was awarded the project and as part of the project local Papunya CDP participants will be directly involved in the construction. The minister’s funding support for the project is much appreciated.

Section 19 leases have been sought for various lots in Papunya, Mutitjulu and Aputula (Finke) as part of future planning and development for ranger, staff and office accommodation

Environment protection and biodiversity

Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 requires Commonwealth authorities to report on environmental matters:

• how activities meet principles of ecologically sustainable development

• how outcomes contributed to ecologically sustainable development

• impacts upon the environment and measures taken to minimise them

• review mechanisms for actions to minimise environmental impact.

Various operational aspects are specifically concerned with the environment. Refer to other outputs in this report, in particular, Output 1.2. Corporate management actions on environmental matters include:

• ongoing development of performance information framework and metrics

• production of the recommended environmental measures for all Commonwealth entities (see Table 32 below).

Table 32. CLC’s performance against Commonwealth recommended environmental measures

Theme

Performance measure

Indicator(s)

Measure

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

2016–17

Energy efficiency

Total consumption of energy – includes all energy consumed when undertaking the functions of the agency, such as energy consumed for office buildings and transportation

Electricity purchased

$

169,668

210,865

163,304

230,688

220,415

Electricity consumed

kWh

691,822

708,093

702,904

720,568

692,957

Gas purchased4

$

24,803

23,979

27,229

16,884

21,410

Other fuels purchased/consumed

L

472,704

569,524

541,876

537,229

566,140

Air travel distances

km

808,780

903,664

691,312

608,154

757,791

Greenhouse gas emissions

Air travel greenhouse gas (CO2)

tonnes

101.6

103.6

85.6

78.0

92.3

Electricity greenhouse gas (CO2)

tonnes

844.0

863.9

857.5

879.1

845.4

Gas greenhouse gas (CO2)

tonnes

27.5

29.3

33.2

14.4

14.9

Other fuels greenhouse gas (CO2)

tonnes

1,276.3

1,537.7

1,463.1

1,343.1

1,415

Total CO2 emissions

tonnes

2,249

2,534

2,439.4

2,314.5

2,368

Relative energy use per employee

Electricity used

KWh per employee

3,057.1

3,133.2

3,016.8

3,044.2

2,999.8

Gas used

Gj per employee

109.6

106.1

116.9

49.7

64.7

Other fuels used

L per employee

2,089

2,520

2,326

2,270

2,451

Renewable energy

Renewable energy1

Electricity produced

kWh

17,610

34,833

56,634

51,178

51,201

Savings

$

4,050

10,910

13,026

11,771

11,776

CO2 savings

tonnes

12.2

24.0

39.1

35

35.3

Renewable electricity in % of total electricity consumed and produced

% kwh

2.5

4.7

7.5

7

6.9

Waste

Total waste – going to landfills

Amount – going to landfills

cbm

464.0

466.6

355.7

356

410

Total waste – going to recycling facilities

Amount – going to recycling facilities

cbm

187.1

177.0

156.0

156

260

Relative waste production

Amount of waste per employee

cbm

2.9

2.8

2.2

2

1.8

Total consumption of water

Amount of water consumed

kl

9,722.0

5,851.0

8,811.2

11,391

7,522

Water

Relative water consumption

Total water use

kl per employee

43.0

25.9

37.8

48

32.6

CO2 offsets

Feral animals removed under National Feral Camel Project

Feral animals removed

number

27,994.0

6,014.0

0.0

0

0

CO2 emission savings (0.96t CO2e/camel/year)

tonnes

26,874.2

5,773.4

0.0

0

0

Feral camels removed2

Feral animals removed

number

480.0

6,294.0

244.0

718

0

CO2 emission savings (0.96t CO2 e/camel/year)5

tonnes

460.8

6,042.2

234.2

689

0

Other feral animals removed
Note 3

Feral animals removed3

number

3,573.0

11,128.0

4,651.0

1,316

2,280

(1.29t CO2 /horse/year)5

tonnes

4,609.2

14,355.1

5,999.8

1,698

2,375

Notes:

1. 20KW at Stuart Highway, 6KW at Cameron Street, 6KW at Kennett Court, total 32KW.

2. Removed by muster off grazing licence or elsewhere.

3. Other feral herbivores removed (horses, donkeys, etc.).

4. Reduction in gas prices secondary to formal contract with supplier; and changes to the supply of gas in remote accommodation (moved to electric cooktops).

5. United Nations FAO 2006.


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